Hour of Code: Step by Step

Step 1: Choose a tutorial from Code.org and sign up on their website.

Step 2: Plan your technology needs. Hour of Code tutorials work on PCs, smartphones, tablets, and some that require no computer at all! You can join wherever you are, with whatever you have. Make sure to test tutorials on student computers or devices to ensure they work properly on browsers with sound and video.

Here are a few options for classrooms with limited devices:

  • Work in pairs. Research shows students learn best with pair programming, sharing a computer and working together. Encourage your students to double up.
  • Use a projected screen. If you have a projector and screen for a Web-connected computer, your entire group can do an Hour of Code together. Watch video portions together and take turns solving puzzles or answering questions.
  • Go unplugged. We offer tutorials that require no computer at all.

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Step 3: Show an inspiring video or invite parents or an engaging speaker to talk about the possibilities in computer science.  Check out this new video playlist that focuses on creativity from Code.org.

Step 4: Direct students to the tutorial and begin coding.

When your students come across difficulties it’s okay to respond:

  • “I don’t know. Let’s figure this out together.”
  • “Technology doesn’t always work out the way we want.”
  • “Learning to program is like learning a new language; you won’t be fluent right away.”

What supports are available for ELL students? 

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  • Code.org can be done in over 25 languages
  • Pair Programming
  • GLAD supports (narrative inputs, t-chart, picture file cards)

 

What if a student finishes early?

  • Students can see all tutorials and try another Hour of Code activity.
  • Or, ask students who finish early to help classmates who are having trouble with the activity.jeff_bezos
Step 5: Celebrate with your students! Remember to share the excitement with families, consider sending this one pager home in an email or through Seesaw.
Do your students love swag? 

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